Wiring Color Codes

By Norman Nock

Originally published in the Austin-Healey Magazine, August 1990


The colors of the electrical wires on Austin-Healeys tell us a story. If you are looking at a group of wires that are going to various places on the car there will be a rainbow of colors.


Plain solid colors like red, white, brown, black, purple, green, and blue tell you which circuit they belong to:

Black

(B)

Earth

Brown

(N)

Always Hot, Not Fused

Purple

(P)

Fused, Always Hot (Late Cars)

White

(W)

Hot with Ignition On, Not Fused

Green

(G)

Fused, Hot with Ignition On

Blue

(U)

Head Light Main Feed, Not Fused

Red

(R)

Park/Tail Lights, Not Fused (Should Be Fused)

The above wire colors may also have a thin line of color running through them, known as a tracer. For example, blue with a white tracer (Blue-White) is saying that the main color blue is part of the headlight circuit and the tracer color says "I am for the high-beam circuit."

Red White

(RW)

The red wire is park/tail lights. The white tracer is for panel lights.

Blue-Red

(UR)

The blue wire is headlights. The red tracer is for low beams.

White-Black

(WB)

The white wire is ignition, not fused. The black tracer indicated the coil to distributor connection.

Green-Yellow

(GY)

The green wire is hot with ignition on and fused. The blue tracer is for left directional indicator.

Purple-Black

(PB)

The purple wire is always hot and fused. The black tracer is for the horn button. (Late cars)

Green-Black

(GB)

The green wire is hot with ignition on and fused the black tracer is for the fuel gauge from the gas tank.

With this information and a little detective work on your part, you can now identify and track down all the wires on your Healey.


Not what you were looking for? Don't forget you can check our back issues using the AHCUSA Magazine Index.

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