Brake Adjusting

By Norman Nock

Originally published in the Austin-Healey Magazine, June 1999



Work done on any part of the brake system should be done by qualified mechanics.


Adjusting Front Brakes


Jack up the car and place it on stands. Turn the hexagonal-headed bolt (figure l-A) clockwise when viewed from the back until the wheel is tight, then back off, one click at a time, until the wheel turns free. There are two adjusting bolts on each front wheel. Adjust all four the same way.


Adjusting Rear Brakes


Tighten the square adjusting nut (figure 2-B) one click at a time until the wheel drags slightly, then back of the adjuster until the wheel turns free.


Brake Fluid


Check the level of the brake fluid. The reservoir metal can should be filled up to one-inch from the top. With reservoirs that are part of the master cylinder, there is a level mark on the body. Note: if the brake fluid is dirty, the seals in the hydraulic system are deteriorating, and the hydraulics should be completely rebuilt.


Hand Brake


Pull up the hand brake lever one click at a time until the rear wheel just starts a SLIGHT DRAG. This should happen on the third click. If more clicks are required, the hand brake cable needs adjusting. The adjuster is found at the rear of the cable. Remove the clevis pin to adjust. If the brake pedal is still low, inspect the linkage for wear between the brake pedal and the master cylinder rod.


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